ph-90146
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Xolair® (omalizumab)

Policy Number: PH-90146

Subcutaneous

Last Review Date: 08/03/2021

Date of Origin: 01/01/2012

Dates Reviewed: 06/2012, 02/2013, 04/2014, 09/2014, 07/2015, 07/2016, 09/2016, 12/2016, 03/2017, 06/2017, 09/2017, 12/2017, 03/2018, 06/2018, 10/2018, 10/2019, 10/2020, 12/2020, 01/2021, 05/2021, 08/2021

FOR PEEHIP Members Only -Coverage excludes the provider-administered medication(s) outlined in this drug policy from being accessed through a specialty pharmacy. It must be obtained through buy and bill.

  1. Length of Authorization

Coverage will be provided for six months and may be renewed, unless otherwise specified.

  • Management of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor-Related Toxicity may NOT be renewed.
  1. Dosing Limits

A.  Quantity Limit (max daily dose) [NDC Unit]:

  • Xolair 75 mg single-dose prefilled syringe: 1 syringe every 14 days
  • Xolair 150 mg single-dose prefilled syringe: 4 syringes every 14 days
  • Xolair 150 mg powder for injection: 4 vials every 14 days

B.  Max Units (per dose and over time) [HCPCS Unit]:

      Allergic Asthma

  • 90 billable units every 14 days

   CRSwNP

  • 120 billable units every 14 days

   All other indications

  • 60 billable units every 28 days
  1. Initial Approval Criteria 1

Coverage is provided in the following conditions:

  • Patient is at least 18 years of age (unless otherwise specified); AND

Universal Criteria 1

  • Must not be used in combination with another anti-IL4 or anti-IL5 monoclonal antibody (e.g., benralizumab mepolizumab, reslizumab, dupilumab, etc.); AND

Moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma † 1-3,20

  • Patient is at least 6 years of age; AND
  • Will not be used for treatment of acute bronchospasm, status asthmaticus, or allergic conditions (other than indicated); AND
  • Patient has a positive skin test or in vitro reactivity to a perennial aero-allergen; AND
  • Patient must weigh between 20 kg (44 lbs.) and 150 kg (330 lbs.); AND
  • Patient has a serum total IgE level, measured before the start of treatment, of either:
    • ≥ 30 IU/mL and ≤ 700 IU/mL in patients age ≥ 12 years; OR
    • ≥ 30 IU/mL and ≤ 1300 IU/mL in patients age 6 to <12 years; AND
  • Patient has documented ongoing symptoms of moderate-to-severe asthma* with a minimum (3) month trial on previous combination therapy including medium- or high-dose inhaled corticosteroids PLUS another controller medication (e.g., long-acting beta-2 agonist, leukotriene receptor antagonist, theophylline, etc.); AND
  • Baseline measurement of at least one of the following for assessment of clinical status:
    • Use of inhaled rescue medication
    • Use of inhaled or systemic corticosteroids
    • Reported disease severity symptoms (e.g., number of hospitalizations, ER visits,  unscheduled visits to healthcare provider due to condition, asthma attacks, chest tightness or heaviness, coughing or clearing throat, difficulty taking deep breath or difficulty breathing out, shortness of breath, sleep disturbance, night wakening, or symptoms upon awakening, tiredness, wheezing/heavy breathing/fighting for air, etc.)
    • Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)

Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) † 1,4-6,8

  • Patient is at least 12 years of age; AND
  • The underlying cause of the patient’s condition is NOT considered to be any other allergic condition(s) or other form(s) of urticaria; AND
  • Patient is avoiding triggers (e.g., NSAIDs, etc.); AND
  • Documented baseline score from an objective clinical evaluation tool, such as: urticaria activity score (UAS7), angioedema activity score (AAS), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Angioedema Quality of Life (AE-QoL), or Chronic Urticaria Quality of Life Questionnaire (CU-Q2oL); AND
  • Patient had an inadequate response to a one or more month trial on previous therapy with scheduled dosing of a second-generation H1-antihistamine product**; AND
  • Patient had an inadequate response to a one or more month trial on previous therapy with scheduled dosing of at least one of the following:
    • Up-dosing/dose advancement (up to 4-fold) of a second generation H1-antihistamine**
    • Add-on therapy with a leukotriene antagonist (e.g., montelukast, zafirlukast, etc.)
    • Add-on therapy with another H1-antihistamine**
    • Add-on therapy with a H2-antagonist (e.g. ranitidine, etc.)
    • Add-on therapy with cyclosporine

Note: renewal will require submission of a current (within 30 days) score from an objective clinical evaluation tool (i.e., UAS7, AAS, DLQI, AE-QoL or CU-Q2oL).

Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps (CRSwNP) 1,22,23

  • Patient has bilateral symptomatic sino-nasal polyposis with symptoms lasting at least 8 weeks; AND
  • Patient has failed at least 8 weeks of daily intranasal corticosteroid therapy; AND
  • Patient has at least four (4) of the following indicators for biologic treatment [Note: Patients with a history of sino-nasal surgery are only required to have at least three (3) of the indicators]:
    • Patient has evidence of type 2 inflammation (i.e., biological biomarkers indicating immune dysregulation and epithelial barrier dysfunction)
    • Patient has required two or more short courses of systemic corticosteroids within the previous year
    • Disease significantly impairs the patient’s quality of life
    • Patient has experienced significant loss of smell
    • Patient has a comorbid diagnosis of asthma; AND
  • Patient does not have any of the following:
            •  
    • Antrochoanal polyps
    • Nasal septal deviation that would occlude at least one nostril
    • Disease with lack of signs of type 2 inflammation
    • Cystic fibrosis
    • Mucoceles; AND
  • Other causes of nasal congestion/obstruction have been ruled out (e.g., acute sinusitis, nasal infection or upper respiratory infection, rhinitis medicamentosa, tumors, infections, granulomatosis, etc.); AND
  • Physician has assessed baseline disease severity utilizing an objective measure/tool; AND
  • Therapy will be used in combination with intranasal corticosteroids unless not able to tolerate or is contraindicated

Management of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor-Related Toxicity ‡ 9,10

  • Patient has been receiving therapy with an immune checkpoint inhibitor (e.g. nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, avelumab, durvalumab, cemiplimab, ipilimumab, etc.); AND
  • Patient has refractory and severe (i.e., grade 3: intense or widespread, constant, limiting self-care activities of daily living or sleep) pruritis; AND
  • Patient has an increased serum IgE level above the upper limit of normal of the laboratory reference value

Systemic Mastocytosis 9,11

  • Used for the prevention of one of the following:
    • Chronic mast cell mediator-related cardiovascular (e.g., pre-syncope, tachycardia, etc.) or pulmonary (e.g., wheezing, throat-swelling, etc.) symptoms insufficiently controlled by conventional therapy (e.g., H1 or H2 blockers or corticosteroids); OR
    • Unprovoked anaphylaxis; OR
    • Hymenoptera or food-induced anaphylaxis in patients with a negative test for specific IgE antibodies or a negative skin test; OR
  • Used to improve tolerance while on immunotherapy (i.e., venom immunotherapy [VIT])

*Components of severity for classifying asthma as moderate may include any of the following (not all inclusive): 2

  • Daily symptoms
  • Nighttime awakenings > 1x/week but not nightly
  • SABA use for symptom control occurs daily
  • Some limitation to normal activities
  • Lung function (percent predicted FEV1) >60%, but <80%
  • Exacerbations requiring oral systemic corticosteroids are generally more frequent and intense relative to mild asthma

*Components of severity for classifying asthma as severe may include any of the following (not all inclusive): 2

  • Symptoms throughout the day
  • Nighttime awakenings, often 7x/week
  • SABA use for symptom control occurs several times daily
  • Extremely limited in normal activities
  • Lung function (percent predicted FEV1) <60%
  • Exacerbations requiring oral systemic corticosteroids are generally more frequent and intense relative to moderate asthma

**H1 Antihistamine Products (not all inclusive) 5,8

  • fexofenadine
  • loratadine
  • desloratadine
  • cetirizine
  • levocetirizine
  • clemastine
  • diphenhydramine
  • chlorpheniramine
  • hydroxyzine
  • cyproheptadine
  • brompheniramine
  • triprolidine
  • dexchlorpheniramine
  • carbinoxamine

FDA-approved indication(s); Compendia recommended indication(s)

  1. Renewal Criteria 1,10,11,22,23
  • Patient continues to meet the universal and other indication-specific relevant criteria identified in section III; AND
  • Absence of unacceptable toxicity from the drug. Examples of unacceptable toxicity include the following: symptoms of anaphylaxis (bronchospasm, hypotension, syncope, urticaria, and/or angioedema), malignancy, symptoms similar to serum sickness (fever, arthralgia, and rash), parasitic (helminth) infection, eosinophilic conditions (e.g. vasculitic rash, worsening pulmonary symptoms, cardiac complications, and/or neuropathy, especially upon reduction of oral corticosteroids), etc.; AND

Moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma

  • Patient must weigh between 20 kg (44 lbs.) and 150 kg (330 lbs.); AND
  • Treatment has resulted in clinical improvement as documented by one or more of the following:
  • Decreased utilization of rescue medications; OR
  • Decreased frequency of exacerbations (defined as worsening of asthma that requires increase in inhaled corticosteroid dose or treatment with systemic corticosteroids); OR
  • Improvement in lung function (increase in percent predicted FEV1 or PEF) from pre-treatment baseline; OR
  • Reduction in reported disease severity symptoms as evidenced by decreases in frequency or magnitude of one or more of the following symptoms:
  • Hospitalizations, ER visits, unscheduled visits to healthcare provider
  • Asthma attacks
  • Chest tightness or heaviness
  • Coughing or clearing throat
  • Difficulty taking deep breath or difficulty breathing out
  • Shortness of breath
  • Sleep disturbance, night wakening, or symptoms upon awakening
  • Tiredness
  • Wheezing/heavy breathing/fighting for air; AND
  • Patient is periodically checked to reassess the need for continued therapy based upon the patient’s disease severity and level of asthma control

Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU)

  • Treatment with Xolair (omalizumab) has resulted in clinical improvement as documented by improvement from baseline using objective clinical evaluation tools such as the urticaria activity score (UAS7), angioedema activity score (AAS), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Angioedema Quality of Life (AE-QoL), or Chronic Urticaria Quality of Life Questionnaire(CU-Q2oL); AND
  • Submitted current UAS7, AAS, DLQI, AE-QoL, or Cu-Q2oL was recorded within the past 30 days.

Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps (CRSwNP)

  • Disease response as indicated by improvement in signs and symptoms compared to baseline in one or more of the following: nasal/obstruction symptoms, improvement of sinus opacifications as assessed by CT-scans and/or an improvement on a disease activity scoring tool (e.g., nasal polyposis score (NPS), nasal congestion (NC) symptom severity score, sino-nasal outcome test-22 (SNOT-22), etc.); OR
  • Patient had an improvement in at least one (1) of the following response criteria:
      • Reduction in nasal polyp size
      • Reduction in need for systemic corticosteroids
      • Improvement in quality of life
      • Improvement in sense of smell
      • Reduction of impact of comorbidities

Management of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor-Related Toxicity

  • May not be renewed

Systemic Mastocytosis

  • Disease response as indicated by improvement in signs and symptoms compared to baseline or a decreased frequency of exacerbations
  1. Dosage/Administration 1,11-13

Indication

Dose

Allergic Asthma

75 to 375 mg administered subcutaneously by a health care provider every 2 or 4 weeks. Determine dose (mg) and dosing frequency by serum total IgE level (IU/mL), measured before the start of treatment, and body weight (kg). See tables below.

§§ The pre-filled syringe formulation may be self-administered after the initial 3 doses are administered in the healthcare setting AND the healthcare provider determines that self-administration is appropriate based on assessment of risk for anaphylaxis and mitigation strategies. See criteria below.

Chronic idiopathic urticaria

150 or 300 mg administered subcutaneously by a health care provider every 4 weeks. Dosing is not dependent on serum IgE (free or total) level or body weight.

§§ The pre-filled syringe formulation may be self-administered after the initial 3 doses are administered in the healthcare setting AND the healthcare provider determines that self-administration is appropriate based on assessment of risk for anaphylaxis and mitigation strategies. See criteria below.

Nasal polyps

75 to 600 mg administered subcutaneously by a health care provider every 2 or 4 weeks.  Determine dose (mg) and dosing frequency by serum total IgE level (IU/mL), measured before the start of treatment, and body weight (kg). See table below.

§§ The pre-filled syringe formulation may be self-administered after the initial 3 doses are administered in the healthcare setting AND the healthcare provider determines that self-administration is appropriate based on assessment of risk for anaphylaxis and mitigation strategies. See criteria below.

Management of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor-Related Toxicity & Systemic Mastocytosis

150 or 300 mg administered subcutaneously every 4 weeks. Dosing is not dependent on serum IgE (free or total) level or body weight.

**Must ONLY be administered by a health care provider.

Criteria for Selection of Patients for Self-Administration of Xolair Prefilled Syringe §§

  • Patient should have no prior history of anaphylaxis, including to Xolair or other agents, such as foods, drugs, biologics, etc.; AND
  • Patient should receive at least 3 doses of Xolair under the guidance of a healthcare provider with no hypersensitivity reactions; AND
  • Patient or caregiver is able to recognize symptoms of anaphylaxis; AND
  • Patient or caregiver is able to treat anaphylaxis appropriately; AND
  • Patient or caregiver is able to perform subcutaneous injections with Xolair prefilled syringe with proper technique according to the prescribed dosing regimen and Instructions for Use

Note: Xolair prefilled syringes for patients under 12 years of age should be administered by a caregiver.

Asthma Omalizumab Doses Administered Every 4 Weeks (mg) in patients ≥ 12 years

Pre-treatment serum IgE (IU/mL)

Body weight (kg)

30 to 60

> 60 to 70

> 70 to 90

> 90 to 150

≥ 30 to 100

150

150

150

300

> 100 to 200

300

300

300

See the following table.

> 200 to 300

300

See the following table.

See the following table.

See the following table.

Asthma Omalizumab Doses Administered Every 2 Weeks (mg) in patients ≥ 12 years

Pre-treatment serum IgE (IU/mL)

Body weight (kg)

30 to 60

> 60 to 70

> 70 to 90

> 90 to 150

> 100 to 200

See previous table.

See previous table.

See previous table.

225

> 200 to 300

See previous table.

225

225

300

> 300 to 400

225

225

300

Do not dose.

> 400 to 500

300

300

375

Do not dose.

> 500 to 600

300

375

Do not dose.

Do not dose.

> 600 to 700

375

Do not dose.

Do not dose.

Do not dose

Asthma Omalizumab Doses Administered Every 2 or 4 Weeks (mg) for Pediatric Patients Who Begin Xolair Between the Ages of 6 to <12 Years

Pre-treatment IgE (IU/mL)

Dosing Freq. (weeks)

Body Weight (kg)

20-25

>25-30

>30-40

>40-50

>50-60

>60-70

>70-80

>80-90

>90-125

>125-150

30-100

4

75

75

75

150

150

150

150

150

300

300

>100-200

150

150

150

300

300

300

300

300

225

300

>200-300

150

150

225

300

300

225

225

225

300

375

>300-400

225

225

300

225

225

225

300

300

>400-500

225

300

225

225

300

300

375

375

>500-600

300

300

225

300

300

375

Do Not Dose

>600-700

300

225

225

300

375

>700-900

2

225

225

300

375

>900-1100

225

300

375

>1100-1200

300

300

>1200-1300

300

375

Nasal Polyps Omalizumab Doses Administered Every 2 or 4 Weeks (mg)

Pre-treatment IgE (IU/mL)

Dosing Freq. (weeks)

Body Weight (kg)

>30-40

>40-50

>50-60

>60-70

>70-80

>80-90

>90-125

>125-150

30-100

4

75

150

150

150

150

150

300

300

>100-200

150

300

300

300

300

300

450

600

>200-300

225

300

300

450

450

450

600

375

>300-400

300

450

450

450

600

600

450

525

>400-500

450

450

600

600

375

375

525

600

>500-600

450

600

600

375

450

450

600

>600-700

450

600

375

450

450

525

>700-800

2

300

375

450

450

525

600

>800-900

300

375

450

525

600

>900-1000

375

450

525

600

Do Not Dose

>1000-1100

375

450

600

>1100-1200

450

525

600

>1200-1300

450

525

>1300-1500

525

600

  1. Billing Code/Availability Information

HCPCS Code:

      •  
    • J2357 – Injection, omalizumab, 5 mg; 1 billable unit = 5 mg

NDC:

      •  
    • Xolair 75 mg single-dose prefilled syringe: 50242-0214-xx
    • Xolair 150 mg single-dose prefilled syringe: 50242-0215-xx
    • Xolair 150 mg single-use vial powder for injection: 50242-0040-xx
  1. References
  1. Xolair [package insert]. South San Francisco, CA; Genentech, Inc.; April 2021. Accessed July 2021.
  2. National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP). Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Expert Panel Report 3. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); August 2007.
  3. Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA).Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention. 2018 Update.  Available from: http://www.ginasthma.org. Accessed April 2018.
  4. Baiardini I, Braido F, Bindslev-Jensen C, et al.  Recommendations for assessing patient-reported outcomes and health-related quality of life in patients with urticaria: a GA (2) LEN taskforce position paper. Allergy. 2011 Jul;66(7):840-4. doi: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2011.02580.x. Epub 2011 Mar 9.
  5. Zuberbier T, Aberer W, Asero R, et al.  EAACI/GA2LEN/EDF/WAO guideline for the Definition, Classification, Diagnosis and Management of Urticaria. The 2017 Revision and Update. Allergy. 2018 Jan 15. doi: 10.1111/all.13397.
  6. Maurer M, Rosén K, Hsieh HJ, et al.  Omalizumab for the treatment of chronic idiopathic or spontaneous urticaria.  N Engl J Med. 2013 Mar 7;368(10):924-35. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1215372. Epub 2013 Feb 24.
  7. Siles RI, Hsieh FH. Allergy blood testing: A practical guide for clinicians. Cleve Clin J Med. 2011 Sep;78(9):585-92. doi: 10.3949/ccjm.78a.11023.
  8. Bernstein JA, Lang DM, Khan DA, et al. The diagnosis and management of acute and chronic urticaria: 2014 update. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014 May;133(5):1270-7.
  9. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Drugs and Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium®) Omalizumab. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 2021. The NCCN Compendium® is a derivative work of the NCCN Guidelines®. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, and NCCN GUIDELINES® are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. To view the most recent and complete version of the Compendium, go online to NCCN.org. Accessed July 2021.
  10. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Management of Immunotherapy-Related Toxicities 3.2021. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 2021. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, and NCCN GUIDELINES® are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. To view the most recent and complete version of the Guidelines, go online to NCCN.org. Accessed July 2021.
  11. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Systemic Mastocytosis Version 3.2021. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 2021. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, and NCCN GUIDELINES® are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. To view the most recent and complete version of the Guidelines, go online to NCCN.org. Accessed July 2021.
  12. Carter MC, Robyn JA, Bressler PB, Walker JC, Shapiro GG, Metcalfe DD. Omalizumab for the treatment of unprovoked anaphylaxis in patients with systemic mastocytosis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;119(6):1550-1551.
  13. Slapnicar C, Trinkaus M, Hicks L, Vadas P. Efficacy of Omalizumab in Indolent Systemic Mastocytosis. Case Rep Hematol. 2019;2019:3787586. Published 2019 Sep 16.
  14. Jendoubi, F, Gaudenzio, N, Gallini, A, et al. Omalizumab in the treatment of adult patients with mastocytosis: A systematic review. Clin Exp Allergy. 2020; 50: 654– 661.
  15. Busse W, Corren J, Lanier BQ, et al. Omalizumab, anti-IgE recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody, for the treatment of severe allergic asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001;108(2):184-190.
  16. Solèr M, Matz J, Townley R, et al. The anti-IgE antibody omalizumab reduces exacerbations and steroid requirement in allergic asthmatics. Eur Respir J. 2001;18(2):254-261.
  17. Lanier B, Bridges T, Kulus M, et al. Omalizumab for the treatment of exacerbations in children with inadequately controlled allergic (IgE-mediated) asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009;124(6):1210-1216.
  18. Milgrom H, Berger W, Nayak A, et al. Treatment of childhood asthma with anti-immunoglobulin E antibody (omalizumab). Pediatrics. 2001;108(2):E36.
  19. Saini SS, Bindslev-Jensen C, Maurer M, et al. Efficacy and safety of omalizumab in patients with chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria who remain symptomatic on H1 antihistamines: a randomized, placebo-controlled study. J Invest Dermatol. 2015;135(1):67-75.
  20. Holguin F, Cardet JC, Chung KF, et al. Management of severe asthma: a European

Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society guideline. Eur Respir J 2020; 55: 1900588 [https://doi.org/10.1183/13993003.00588-2019].

  1. Gevaert P, Omachi TA, Corren J, et al. Efficacy and safety of omalizumab in nasal polyposis: 2 randomized phase 3 trials. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2020 Sep;146(3):595-605. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2020.05.032. Epub 2020 Jun 7.
  2. Fokkens WJ, Lund V, Bachert C, et al. EUFOREA consensus on biologics for CRSwNP with or without asthma. Allergy. 2019;74(12):2312–2319. doi:10.1111/all.13875.
  3. Gandhi NA, Bennett BL, Graham NMH, et al. Targeting key proximal drivers of type 2 inflammation in disease. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2016;15(1):35-50.
  4. ASCIA Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria (CSU) Position Paper and Treatment Guidelines; updated July 2020. Available at: https://www.allergy.org.au/hp/papers/chronic-spontaneous-urticaria-csu-guidelines
  5. First Coast Service Options, Inc. Local Coverage Article: Billing and Coding: Omalizumab (A57658). Centers for Medicare & Medicare Services. Updated on 11/22/2019 with effective dates 10/03/2018. Accessed July 2021.
  6. National Government Services, Inc. Local Coverage Article: Billing and Coding: Omalizumab (A52448). Centers for Medicare & Medicare Services. Updated on 06/25/2021 with effective dates 07/01/2021. Accessed July 2021.

Appendix 1 – Covered Diagnosis Codes

ICD-10

ICD-10 Description

C94.30

Mast cell leukemia not having achieved remission

C94.31

Mast cell leukemia, in remission

C94.32

Mast cell leukemia, in relapse

C96.20

Malignant mast cell neoplasm, unspecified

C96.21

Aggressive systemic mastocytosis

C96.22

Mast cell sarcoma

C96.29

Other malignant mast cell neoplasm

D47.02

Systemic mastocytosis

J33

Nasal polyp

J33.0

Polyp of nasal cavity

J33.1

Polypoid sinus degeneration

J33.8

Other polyp of sinus

J33.9

Nasal polyp, unspecified

J45.40

Moderate persistent asthma, uncomplicated

J45.50

Severe persistent asthma, uncomplicated

L29.8

Other pruritus

L29.9

Pruritus, unspecified

L50.1

Idiopathic urticaria

Appendix 2 – Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

Medicare coverage for outpatient (Part B) drugs is outlined in the Medicare Benefit Policy Manual (Pub. 100-2), Chapter 15, §50 Drugs and Biologicals. In addition, National Coverage Determination (NCD), Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs), and Local Coverage Articles (LCAs) may exist and compliance with these policies is required where applicable. They can be found at: http://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/advanced-search.aspx. Additional indications may be covered at the discretion of the health plan.

Medicare Part B Covered Diagnosis Codes (applicable to existing NCD/LCD/LCA):

Jurisdiction(s): N (9)

NCD/LCD Document (s): A57658

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/new-search/search-results.aspx?keyword=a57658&areaId=all&docType=NCA%2CCAL%2CNCD%2CMEDCAC%2CTA%2CMCD%2C6%2C3%2C5%2C1%2CF%2CP

Jurisdiction(s): 6, K

NCD/LCD Document (s): A52448

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/new-search/search-results.aspx?keyword=a52448&areaId=all&docType=NCA%2CCAL%2CNCD%2CMEDCAC%2CTA%2CMCD%2C6%2C3%2C5%2C1%2CF%2CP

Medicare Part B Administrative Contractor (MAC) Jurisdictions

Jurisdiction

Applicable State/US Territory

Contractor

E (1)

CA, HI, NV, AS, GU, CNMI

Noridian Healthcare Solutions, LLC

F (2 & 3)

AK, WA, OR, ID, ND, SD, MT, WY, UT, AZ

Noridian Healthcare Solutions, LLC

5

KS, NE, IA, MO

Wisconsin Physicians Service Insurance Corp. (WPS)

6

MN, WI, IL

National Government Services, Inc. (NGS)

H (4 & 7)

LA, AR, MS, TX, OK, CO, NM

Novitas Solutions, Inc.

8

MI, IN

Wisconsin Physicians Service Insurance Corp. (WPS)

N (9)

FL, PR, VI

First Coast Service Options, Inc.

J (10)

TN, GA, AL

Palmetto GBA, LLC

M (11)

NC, SC, WV, VA (excluding below)

Palmetto GBA, LLC

L (12)

DE, MD, PA, NJ, DC (includes Arlington & Fairfax counties and the city of Alexandria in VA)

Novitas Solutions, Inc.

K (13 & 14)

NY, CT, MA, RI, VT, ME, NH

National Government Services, Inc. (NGS)

15

KY, OH

CGS Administrators, LLC

 

 

 

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