ph-0071
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Immune Globulins IV (Asceniv, Bivigam, Carimune NF, Flebogamma 10% DIF, Flebogamma 5% DIF, Gamunex-C, Gammagard Liquid, Gammagard S/D, Gammaked, Gammaplex, Octagam, Privigen, Panzyga)

Policy Number: PH-0071

Intravenous

 

Last Review Date: 10/01/2019

Date of Origin: 07/20/2010

Dates Reviewed: 09/2010, 12/2010, 02/2011, 03/2011, 06/2011, 09/2011, 10/2011, 12/2011, 03/2012, 06/2012, 09/2012, 12/2012, 03/2013, 05/2013, 06/2013, 09/2013, 12/2013, 03/2014, 06/2014, 09/2014, 12/2014, 03/2015, 06/2015, 09/2015, 12/2015, 03/2016, 06/2016, 09/2016, 12/2016, 03/2017, 06/2017, 09/2017, 12/2017, 03/2018, 06/2018, 09/2018, 10/2018, 05/2019, 10/2019

  1. Length of Authorization
  • Initial and renewal authorization periods vary by specific covered indication.
  • Unless otherwise specified, the initial authorization will be provided for 6 months and may be renewed.
  1. Dosing Limits

          A.  Quantity Limit (max daily dose) [Pharmacy Benefit]:

Drug

Vial size in IgG grams

# of vials

One time only

per 28 days

LOAD

MAINTENANCE

Asceniv

5

18

18

Bivigam*

5

1

1

10

23

23

Carimune NF*

3,6

1

1

12

19

19

Flebogamma 10% DIF

5, 10, 20

1

1

20

11

11

Flebogamma 5% DIF

2.5, 5, 10

1

1

20

11

11

Gamunex-C

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20

1

1

40

6

6

Gammagard Liquid

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20

1

1

30

8

8

Gammagard S/D*

5

1

1

10

23

23

Gammaked

1, 2.5, 5, 10

1

1

20

11

11

Gammaplex

2.5, 5, 10

1

1

20

11

11

Octagam 10%

2, 5, 10

1

1

20

11

11

Octagam 5%

1, 2.5, 5, 10

1

1

25

9

9

Privigen

5, 10, 20

1

1

40

6

6

Panzyga

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20

1

1

30

8

8

*Discontinued by the manufacturer

      B.  Max Units (per dose and over time) [Medical Benefit]:

Indication

Billable Units

Per # days

(unless otherwise specified)

PID

184

21

CIDP

Load: 460

4

Maintenance: 230

21

Immune thrombocytopenia/ITP

460

28

FAIT

200

7

Kawasaki’s Disease (Pediatric Patients only)

232

1 dose only

Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

460

28

CLL/MM

92

21

ALL

92

21

HIV (Pediatric Patients only)

47

28

Guillain-Barre

460

5 (for one cycle only)

Myasthenia Gravis

460

28

Auto-immune blistering diseases

460

28

Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplant

115

7

Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis

460

28

Complications of transplanted solid organ

(kidney, liver, lung, heart and pancreas transplants)

460

28

Stiff Person

460

28

Toxic shock syndrome

460

5 (for one cycle only)

NAIT

16

2 doses only

Management of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Related Toxicity

460

5 (for one cycle only)

  1. Initial Approval Criteria

Coverage is provided in the following conditions:

  • Baseline values for BUN and serum creatinine obtained within 30 days of request; AND

Primary immunodeficiency (PID)/Wiskott - Aldrich syndrome

Such as: x-linked agammaglobulinemia, common variable immunodeficiency, transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy, IgG subclass deficiency with or without IgA deficiency, antibody deficiency with near normal immunoglobulin levels) and combined deficiencies (severe combined immunodeficiencies, ataxia-telangiectasia, x-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome) [list not all inclusive]

  • Patient’s IgG level is < 200 mg/dL OR both of the following
    • Patient has a history of multiple hard to treat infections as indicated by at least one of the following:
    • Four or more ear infections within 1 year
    • Two or more serious sinus infections within 1 year
    • Two or more months of antibiotics with little effect
    • Two or more pneumonias within 1 year
    • Recurrent or deep skin abscesses
    • Need for intravenous antibiotics to clear infections
    • Two or more deep-seated infections including septicemia; AND
    • The patient has a deficiency in producing antibodies in response to vaccination; AND
    • Titers were drawn before challenging with vaccination; AND
    • Titers were drawn between 4 and 8 weeks of vaccination

Immune thrombocytopenia/Idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) †

For acute disease state:

  • To manage acute bleeding due to severe thrombocytopenia (platelet counts less than 30 X 109/L); OR
  • To increase platelet counts prior to invasive surgical procedures such as splenectomy. (Platelets less than 100 X 109/L); OR
  • Patient has severe thrombocytopenia (platelet counts less than 20 X 109/L) and is considered to be at risk for intracerebral hemorrhage

Note: Authorization is valid for 1 month only and cannot be renewed

Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenia (CIT):

  • The patient is at increased risk for bleeding as indicated by a platelet count less than 30 X 109/L; AND
  • History of failure, contraindication, or intolerance to corticosteroids; AND
  • Duration of illness > 6 months; AND
  • Patient age ≥ 2 years

Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) †

  • Patient’s disease course is progressive or relapsing and remitting for 2 months or longer; AND
  • Patient has abnormal or absent deep tendon reflexes in upper or lower limbs; AND
  • Electrodiagnostic testing indicating demyelination:
  • Partial motor conduction block in at least two motor nerves or in 1 nerve plus one other demyelination criterion listed here in at least 1 other nerve; OR
  • Distal CMAP duration increase in at least 1 nerve plus one other demyelination criterion listed here in at least 1 other nerve; OR
  • Abnormal temporal dispersion conduction must be present in at least 2 motor nerves; OR
  • Reduced conduction velocity in at least 2 motor nerves; OR
  • Prolonged distal motor latency in at least 2 motor nerves; OR
  • Absent F wave in at least two motor nerves plus one other demyelination criterion listed here in at least 1 other nerve; OR
  • Prolonged F wave latency in at least 2 motor nerves; AND
  • Patient is refractory or intolerant to corticosteroids (e.g., prednisolone, prednisone, etc.) given in therapeutic doses over at least three months; AND
  • Baseline in strength/weakness has been documented using an objective clinical measuring tool (e.g., INCAT, Medical Research Council (MRC) muscle strength, 6-MWT, Rankin, Modified Rankin, etc.)

Note: Initial authorization is valid for 3 months

Guillain-Barre Syndrome (Acute inflammatory polyneuropathy)

  • Patient’s disease is severe (i.e., patient requires assistance to ambulate); AND
  • Onset of symptoms are recent (i.e., less than 1 month); AND
  • Patient has abnormal or absent deep tendon reflexes in upper or lower limbs; AND
  • Patient diagnosis is confirmed using a cerebrospinal fluid analysis; AND
  • Approval will be granted for a maximum of 2 rounds of therapy within 6 weeks of onset

Note: Authorization is valid for 2 months only and cannot be renewed

Multifocal Motor Neuropathy †

  • Patient has progressive multi-focal weakness (without sensory symptoms); AND
  • Complete or partial conduction block or abnormal temporal dispersion conduction must be present in at least 2 motor nerves with accompanying normal sensory nerve conduction study across the same nerve that demonstrated the conduction block; AND
  • Baseline in strength/weakness has been documented using an objective clinical measuring tool (e.g., INCAT, Medical Research Council (MRC) muscle strength, 6-MWT, Rankin, Modified Rankin, etc.)

Note: Initial authorization is valid for 3 months

HIV infected children: Bacterial control or prevention

  • Patient age does not exceed 13 years of age; AND
  • Patient’s IgG level is less than 400 mg/dL

Myasthenia Gravis

  • Patient has a positive serologic test for anti-acetylcholine receptor (AchR) antibodies; AND
  • Patient has an acute exacerbation resulting in impending myasthenic crisis (i.e., respiratory compromise, acute respiratory failure, and/or bulbar compromise); AND
  • Patient is failing on conventional immunosuppressant therapy alone (e.g., corticosteroids, azathioprine, cyclosporine, mycophenolate, methotrexate, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, etc.); AND
  • Patient will be on combination therapy with corticosteroids or other immunosuppressant (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate, cyclosporine, methotrexate, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, etc.)

Note: Authorization is valid for 1 course (1 month) only and cannot be renewed

Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis

  • Patient has severe active disease; AND
  • Patient has proximal weakness in all upper and/or lower limbs; AND
  • Diagnosis has been confirmed by muscle biopsy; AND
  • Patient has failed a trial of corticosteroids (i.e., prednisone); AND
  • Patient has failed a trial of an immunosuppressant (e.g., methotrexate, azathioprine, etc.); AND
  • Must be used as part of combination therapy with other agents; AND
  • Patient has a documented baseline physical exam and muscular strength/function

Note: Initial authorization is valid for 3 months

Complications of transplanted solid organ (kidney, liver, lung, heart, pancreas) and bone marrow transplant

Coverage is provided for one or more of the following (list not all-inclusive):

  • Suppression of panel reactive anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies prior to transplantation
  • Treatment of antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplantation
  • Prevention or treatment of viral infections (e.g., cytomegalovirus, Parvo B-19 virus, and Polyoma BK virus)

Stiff-Person Syndrome

  • Patient has anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies; AND
  • Patient has failed at least 2 of the following treatments: benzodiazepines, baclofen, gabapentin, valproate, tiagabine, or levetiracetam; AND
  • Patient has a documented baseline on physical exam

Allogeneic Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplant

  • Used for prevention of acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (aGVHD) or infection; AND
  • Patient’s BMT was allogeneic; AND
  • Patient’s IgG level is less than 400 mg/dL

Note: Initial authorization is valid for 3 months

Kawasaki’s disease (Pediatric) †

Note: Authorization is valid for 1 course (1 month) only and cannot be renewed

Fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FAIT)

  • Patient has a history of one or more of the following:
    • Previous FAIT pregnancy
    • Family history of the disease
    • Screening reveals platelet alloantibodies

Note: Authorization is valid through the delivery date only and cannot be renewed

Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

Note: Authorization is valid for 1 course (1 month) only and cannot be renewed

Auto-immune Mucocutaneous Blistering Diseases ‡

  • Patient has been diagnosed with one of the following:
    • Pemphigus vulgaris
    • Pemphigus foliaceus
    • Bullous Pemphigoid
    • Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid (a.k.a. Cicatricial Pemphigoid)
    • Epidermolysis bullosa aquisita
    • Pemphigus gestationis (Herpes gestationis)
    • Linear IgA dermatosis; AND
  • Patient has severe disease that is extensive and debilitating; AND
  • Diagnosis has been confirmed by biopsy; AND
  • Patient’s disease is progressive; AND
  • Disease is refractory to a trial of conventional therapy with corticosteroids and concurrent immunosuppressive treatment (e.g., azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, etc.); AND
  • Patient has a documented baseline on physical exam

Acquired Immune Deficiency secondary to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

  • Used for prevention of infection; AND
  • Patient age is less than 18 years old; AND
  • Patient’s IgG level is less than 400 mg/dL

Acquired Immune Deficiency secondary to Chronic lymphocytic leukemia † or Multiple Myeloma ‡

  • Patient’s IgG level is <200 mg/dL; OR
  • Patient has a history of multiple hard to treat infections as indicated by at least one of the following:
    • Four or more ear infections within 1 year
    • Two or more serious sinus infections within 1 year
    • Two or more months of antibiotics with little effect
    • Two or more pneumonias within 1 year
    • Recurrent or deep skin abscesses
    • Need for intravenous antibiotics to clear infections
    • Two or more deep-seated infections including septicemia

Note: other secondary immunodeficiencies resulting in hypogammaglobulinemia and/or B-cell aplasia will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis

Toxic Shock Syndrome ‡

Note: Authorization is valid for 1 course (1 month) only and cannot be renewed

Management of Immune-Checkpoint-Inhibitor Related Toxicity

  • Patient has been receiving therapy with an immune checkpoint inhibitor (e.g. nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, avelumab, durvalumab, etc.); AND
  • Patient has one of the following toxicities related to their immunotherapy:
            • Myasthenia gravis refractory to high-dose corticosteroids
            • Severe transverse myelitis
            • Moderate or severe Guillain-Barre Syndrome or peripheral neuropathy toxicity used in combination with pulse-dose methylprednisolone
            • Severe pneumonitis refractory to methylprednisolone after 48 hours of therapy
            • Encephalitis used in combination with pulse-dose methylprednisolone
            • Severe inflammatory arthritis refractory to 14 days of high-dose corticosteroid therapy

            † FDA Approved Indication(s), Compendia/Literature Supported Indication(s)

*For Reference Use Only

Brand Name/ Formulation

FDA Indication

Contraindications

Product Specs

Comments

Asceniv

PID (≥12yo)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

  • IgA: ≤200 mcg/mL
  • Osmolality: N/A
  • Stabilizer: Glycine

Other stabilizer used is Polysorbate 80

Bivigamv (liquid)

PID (peds ≥6)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

  • IgA: ≤200 mcg/mL
  • Osmolality: 510 mOsm/kg
  • Stabilizer: glycine

Carimune NF v(lyophilized)

PID (peds/adults)

a/cITP (peds/adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

  • IgA: 1000-2000 mcg/mL (6% soln)
  • Osmolality: 192 to 1074 mOsm/kg (depends on diluent and final conc)
  • Stabilizer: sucrose

1.67 gm of sugar per gm of protein

Flebogamma 5% (liquid)

PID (peds ≥2)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: <50 mcg/mL

Osmolarity: 240 to 370 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: sorbitol

Flebogamma 10% (liquid)

PID (peds ≥2)

ITP (peds ≥2)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: <32 mcg/mL

Osmolarity: 240 to 370 mOsm/L

Stabilizer: sorbitol

Gammagard (liquid)

PID (peds ≥2)

MMN (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: 37 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 240 to 300 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: glycine

May be used SC (see policy for criteria

Gammagard S/D v (lyophilized)

PID

ITP

CLL

Kawasaki

(adults/peds for all indx)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: <1 mcg/mL (5% solution)

Osmolality: 636 mOsm/L (5% soln)

Stabilizer: glycine

Contains some sugar (20mg/mL when prepared)

Gammaked (liquid)

PID (peds ≥2)

ITP (peds/adults)

CIDP (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: 46 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 258 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: glycine

May be used SC (see policy for criteria

Gammaplex 5% (liquid)

PID (peds ≥2)

cITP (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

Fructose intolerance

IgA: <10 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 420 to 500 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: glycine

Other stabilizer used is Polysorbate 80

Gammaplex 10% (liquid)

PID (adults)

cITP (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: <20 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 280 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: glycine

Other stabilizer used is Polysorbate 80

Gamunex-C (liquid)

PID (peds ≥2)

ITP (peds/adults)

CIDP (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: 46 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 258 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: glycine

May be used SC (see policy for criteria

Octagam 5% (liquid)

PID (peds≥6)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

Corn allergy

IgA: ≤200 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 310 to 380 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: maltose

Octagam 10% (liquid)

ITP (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: 106 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 310 to 390 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: maltose

Privigen (liquid)

PID

cITP (ped ≥15)

CIDP (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

Hyperprolinemia

IgA: ≤25 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 320 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: L-proline

Panzyga

PID (peds ≥2)

cITP (adults)

History of anaphylaxis to IgG

IgA-deficient with IgA antibodies

IgA: ≤100 mcg/mL

Osmolality: 240-310 mOsm/kg

Stabilizer: Glycine

  • All intravenous immunoglobulins are derived from human plasma.
  • Products with higher IgA content pose a greater risk for anaphylactic reactions, especially in patients with IgA deficiencies.
  • All products may predispose patients to nephrotoxicity especially those with sugar-based or proline-based stabilizers. To lower risks, lower concentration products and infusions rates should be used as well as using products with osmolality/osmolarity that is near physiologic range (around 300 mOsm/kg or mOsm/L).
  • Premedications (e.g., acetaminophen, antihistamine, etc) are recommended to reduce the risk of infusion related reactions.

Adapted from: Professional Resource, Comparison of IVIG Products. Pharmacist’s Letter/Prescriber’s Letter. December 2016.

vDiscontinued by the manufacturer

  1. Renewal Criteria

Coverage can be renewed based upon the following criteria:

Note: unless otherwise specified, renewal authorizations are provided for 1 year

  • Patient continues to meet criteria identified in section III; AND
  • Absence of unacceptable toxicity from the drug. Examples of unacceptable toxicity include the following: acute kidney injury, thrombosis, hemolysis, hypersensitivity, pulmonary adverse reactions, volume overload, etc.; AND
  • BUN and serum creatinine have been obtained within the last 6 months and the concentration and rate of infusion have been adjusted accordingly; AND
  • Patient meets the disease-specific criteria identified below:

Primary Immunodeficiency (PID)

  • Disease response as evidenced by one or more of the following:
    • Decrease in the frequency of infection
    • Decrease in the severity of infection

Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenia/ITP

  • Disease response as indicated by the achievement and maintenance of a platelet count of at least 50 X 109/L as necessary to reduce the risk for bleeding

Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

  • Renewals will be authorized for patients that have demonstrated a clinical response to therapy based on an objective clinical measuring tool (e.g., INCAT, Medical Research Council (MRC) muscle strength, 6-MWT, Rankin, Modified Rankin, etc.)

Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

  • Renewals will be authorized for patients that have demonstrated a clinical response to therapy based on an objective clinical measuring tool (e.g., INCAT, Medical Research Council (MRC) muscle strength, 6-MWT, Rankin, Modified Rankin, etc.)

HIV infected children: Bacterial control or prevention

  • Disease response as evidenced by one or more of the following:
    • Decrease in the frequency of infection
    • Decrease in the severity of infection; AND
    • Patient continues to be at an increased risk of infection necessitating continued therapy

Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis

  • Patient had an improvement from baseline on physical exam and/or muscular strength and function

Note: Renewal authorizations are provided for 6 months

Complications of transplanted solid organ (kidney, liver, lung, heart, pancreas) and bone marrow transplant

  • Disease response as evidenced by one or more of the following:
    • Decrease in the frequency of infection
    • Decrease in the severity of infection; AND
  • Patient is at a decreased risk of infection as a result of treatment necessitating continued therapy

Stiff Person Syndrome

  • Documented improvement from baseline on physical exam

Allogeneic Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplant

  • Patient’s IgG trough is less than 400 mg/dL

Note: Renewal authorizations are provided for 3 months

Auto-Immune Mucocutaneous Blistering Diseases

  • Documented improvement from baseline on physical exam

Note: Renewal authorizations are provided for 6 months

Acquired Immune Deficiency secondary to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Multiple Myeloma

  • Disease response as evidenced by one or more of the following:
    • Decrease in the frequency of infection
    • Decrease in the severity of infection; AND
  • Patient is at a decreased risk of infection as a result of treatment necessitating continued therapy

Acquired Immune Deficiency secondary to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

  • Disease response as evidenced by one or more of the following:
    • Decrease in the frequency of infection
    • Decrease in the severity of infection; AND
  • Patient is at a decreased risk of infection as a result of treatment necessitating continued therapy

Management of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor related Toxicity ‡

  • May not be renewed.

Dosing Recommendations:

  • Patient’s dose should be reduced to the lowest necessary to maintain benefit for their condition. Patients who are stable, or who have reached the maximum therapeutic response, should have a trial of dose reduction (e.g., 25-50% reduction in dose every 3 months).
  • Patients who have tolerated dose reduction and continue to show sustained improvement (i.e. remission) should have a trial of treatment discontinuation; with the following exceptions:
    • PID would be excluded from a trial of discontinuation
    • HIV-infected children should show satisfactory control of the underlying disease [e.g., undetectable viral load, CD4 counts elevated above 200 or >15% (ages 9 months – 5 years) on antiretroviral therapy, etc.]
    • Solid organ transplant, CLL, and MM patients should not be at an increased risk of infection
  1. Dosage/Administration

Dosing should be calculated using adjusted body weight if one or more of the following criteria are met:

  • Patient’s body mass index (BMI) is 30 kg/m2 or more; OR
  • Patient’s actual body weight is 20% higher than his or her ideal body weight (IBW)

Use the following dosing formulas to calculate the adjusted body weight (round dose to nearest 5 gram increment in adult patients):

Dosing formulas

BMI = 703 x (weight in pounds/height in inches2)

IBW (kg) for males = 50 + [2.3 (height in inches – 60)]

IBW (kg) for females = 45.5 + [2.3 x (height in inches – 60)]

Adjusted body weight = IBW + 0.5 (actual body weight – IBW)

This information is not meant to replace clinical decision making when initiating or modifying medication therapy and should only be used as a guide. Patient-specific variables should be taken into account.

Indication

Dose

PID

200 to 800 mg/kg every 21 to 28 days

CIDP

2 g/kg divided over 2-5 days initially, then 1 g/kg administered in 1-2 infusions every 21 days

ITP

2 g/kg divided over 5 days or 1 g/kg once daily for 2 consecutive days in a 28-day cycle

FAIT

1 g/kg/week until delivery

Kawasaki’s Disease (Pediatric Patients)

1 g/kg to 2 g/kg x 1 course

Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

Up to 2 g/kg divided over 5 days in a 28-day cycle

Acquired immune deficiency: CLL, MM and ALL

400 mg/kg every 3 to 4 weeks

Pediatric HIV

400 mg/kg every 2 to 4 weeks

Guillain-Barre

2 g/kg divided over 5 days x 1 course

Myasthenia Gravis

1-2 g/kg divided as either 0.5 g/kg daily x 2 days or 0.4 g/kg daily x 5 days x 1 course

Auto-immune blistering diseases

Up to 2 g/kg divided over 5 days in a 28-day cycle

Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis

2 g/kg divided over 2 to 5 days in a 28-day cycle

Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplant

500 mg/kg once weekly x 90 days, then 500 mg/kg every 3 to 4 weeks

Complications of transplanted solid organ: (kidney, liver, lung, heart, pancreas) transplant

2 g/kg divided over 5 days in a 28-day cycle

Stiff Person

2 g/kg divided over 5 days in a 28-day cycle

Toxic shock syndrome

2 g/kg divided over 5 days x 1 course

Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

1 g/kg x 1 dose, may be repeated once if needed

Management of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Related Toxicity

2 g/kg divided over 5 days x 1 course

*Dosing for IVIG is highly variable depending on numerous patient specific factors, indication(s), and the specific product selected. For specific dosing regimens refer to current prescribing literature.

  1. Billing Code/Availability Information

HCPCS code & NDC:

Drug

Manufacturer

J-Code

1 Billable Unit Equivalent

IgG (grams) per SDV

NDC

Asceniv

ADMA Biologics

J1599

500mg

5

N/A

Bivigamv

Biotest Pharmaceuticals

J1556

500 mg

5

59730-6502-XX

10

59730-6503-XX

Carimune NFv

CSL Behring AG

J1566

500 mg

6

44206-0417-XX

12

44206-0418-XX

Flebogamma 10% DIF

Instituto Grifols, S.A.

J1572

500 mg

5, 10, 20

61953-0005-XX

Flebogamma 5% DIF

2.5, 5, 10, 20

61953-0004-XX

Gamunex-C

Grifols Therapeutics

J1561

500 mg

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40

13533-0800-XX

Gammagard Liquid

Baxalta

J1569

500 mg

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 30

00944-2700-XX

Gammagard S/D Less IGA v

Baxalta

J1566

500 mg

5

00944-2656-XX

10

00944-2658-XX

Gammaked

Grifols Therapeutics

J1561

500 mg

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20

76125-0900-XX

Gammaplex 5%

Bio Products Laboratory

J1557

500 mg

5, 10, 20

64208-8234-XX

Gammaplex 10%

5, 10, 20

64208-8235-XX

Octagam 10%

Octapharma USA Inc

J1568

500 mg

2, 5, 10, 20

68982-0850-XX

Octagam 5%

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 25

68982-0840-XX

Privigen

CSL Behring LLC

J1459

500 mg

5

44206-0436-XX

10

44206-0437-XX

20

44206-0438-XX

40

44206-0439-XX

Panzyga

Octapharma USA Inc

J1599

500mg

1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 30

68982-0820-XX

Injection, immune globulin, intravenous, non-lyophilized (e.g., liquid), not otherwise specified

N/A

J1599

500 mg

N/A

N/A

vDiscontinued by the manufacturer

  1. References
  1. Bivigam™ [package insert]. Boca Raton, FL; Biotest Pharmaceuticals; January 2017. Accessed September 2019.
  2. Carimune®NF [package insert]. Berne, Switzerland; CSL Behring AG; May 2018. Accessed September 2019.
  3. Flebogamma® 10% DIF [package insert]. Barcelona, Spain; Instituto Grifols, S.A.; July 2017. Accessed September 2019.
  4. Flebogamma® 5% DIF [package insert]. Barcelona, Spain; Instituto Grifols, S.A.; July 2017. Accessed September 2019.
  5. Gammagard Liquid [package insert]. Westlake Village, CA; Baxalta US Inc.; June 2016. Accessed September 2019.
  6. Gammagard S/D Less IgA [package insert]. Westlake Village, CA; Baxalta US Inc.; September 2016. Accessed September 2019.
  7. Gamunex®-C [package insert]. Research Triangle, NC; Grifols Therapeutics, Inc.; June 2018. Accessed September 2019.
  8. Gammaked™ [package insert]. Research Triangle, NC; Grifols Therapeutics, Inc; March 2017. Accessed September 2019.
  9. Gammaplex® 5% [package insert]. Durham, NC; Bio Products Laboratory Ltd.; December 2018. Accessed September 2019.
  10. Gammaplex® 10% [package insert]. Durham, NC; Bio Products Laboratory Ltd.; December 2018. Accessed September 2019.
  11. Octagam® 5% [package insert]. Hoboken, NJ; Octapharma USA Inc; May 2018. Accessed September 2019.
  12. Octagam® 10% [package insert]. Hoboken, NJ; Octapharma USA Inc; May 2018. Accessed September 2019.
  13. Privigen® [package insert]. Berne, Switzerland; CSL Behring LLC; March 2019. Accessed September 2019.
  14. Panzyga® [package insert].  Hoboken, NJ; Octapharma USA Inc; August 2018.  Accessed September 2019.
  15. Asceniv™ [package insert]. Boca Raton, FL; ADMA Biologics; April 2019. Accessed September 2019.
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  17. Van den Bergh PY, Hadden RD, Bouche P, et al. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies [trunc]. Eur J Neurol 2010 Mar;17(3):356-63
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  20. Donofrio PD, Berger A, Brannagan TH, et al. Consensus statement: The use of intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of neuromuscular conditions report of the AANEM ad hoc committee. Muscle Nerve. 2009;40:890-900.
  21. Feasby T, Banwell B, Benstead T, et al. Guidelines on the use of intravenous immune globulin for neurologic conditions. Transfus Med Rev. 2007;21(2 suppl 1):S57-107.
  22. Gajdos P, Tranchant C, Clair B, et al; Myasthenia Gravis Clinical Study Group. Treatment of myasthenia gravis exacerbation with intravenous immunoglobulin: a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Arch Neurol. 2005;62(11):1689-1693.
  23. Elovaara I, et al. EFNS guidelines for the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases: EFNS task force on the use of intravenous immunoglobulin in treatment of neurological diseases. European Journal of Neurology 2008;15(9):893-908.
  24. Joint Task Force of the EFNS and the PNS. European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society guideline on management of multifocal motor neuropathy. Report of a joint task force of the European Federation of Neurological Societies and the Peripheral Nerve Society--first revision. J Peripher Nerv Syst. 2010 Dec;15(4):295-301. doi: 10.1111/j.1529-8027.2010.00290.x.
  25. Hahn AF, Bolton CF, Pillay N, et al. Plasma exchange therapy in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. A double-blind, sham controlled, cross-over study. Brain 1996;119:1055–66.
  26. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Developments Intravenous Immunoglobulin Study Group. Intravenous immune globulin for the prevention of bacterial infections in children with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection. N Engl J Med. 1991 Jul 11;325(2):73-80.
  27. Silberry GK, Abzug MJ, Nachman, S, et al. Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children: Recommendations from the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc. 2013 Nov; 32 Suppl 2: i-KK4.
  28.  Wolfe GI, Barohn RJ, Foster BM, et al; Myasthenia Gravis-IVIG Study Group. Randomized, controlled trial of intravenous immunoglobulin in myasthenia gravis. Muscle Nerve. 2002;26(4):549-552.
  29. Hughes RA, Wijdicks EF, Barohn R, et al; Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Practice parameter: immunotherapy for Guillain-Barré syndrome: report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology. 2003;61(6):736-740.
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  31. Bussel, JB et al. Antenatal management of alloimmune thrombocytopenia with Intravenous Immunoglobulin: A randomized trial of low dose steroid to intravenous immunoglobulin. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1996; 174 1414-23.
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  33. Ahmed AR, Spigelman Z, Cavacine LA et al. Treatment of pemphigus vulgaris with rituximab and intravenous immune globulin. N Eng J Med 2006; 1772-9
  34. American Academy of Pediatrics Subcommittee on Hyperbilirubinemia. Management of hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn infant 35 or more weeks of gestation. Pediatrics 2004; 114:297-316
  35. Gottstein R, Cooke R. Systematic Review of intravenous immunoglobulin in haemolytic disease of the newborn. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2003; 88:F6-10
  36. Anderson D, Ali K, Blanchette V, et al. Guidelines on the use of intravenous immune globulin for hematologic conditions. Transfus Med Rev. 2007;21(2 Suppl 1):S9-56.
  37.  Orange J, Hossny E, Weiler C, et al. Use of intravenous immunoglobulin in human disease: A review of evidence by members of the Primary Immunodeficiency Committee of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2006;117(4 Suppl): S525-53.
  38. Stasi R, Evangelista ML, Stipa E, et al. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: current concepts in pathophysiology and management. Thrombosis and Haemostasis 2008;99(1):4-13.
  39. Amagai M, Ikeda S, Shimizu H, et al. A randomized, double-blind trial of intravenous immunoglobulin for pemphigus. J Am Acad Dermatol 2009; 60:595-602
  40. Ahmed AR. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in the treatment of patients with pemphigus vulgaris unresponsive to conventional immunosuppressive treatment. J Am Acad Dermatol 2001; 45:679-90.
  41. Hughes R, Bensa S, Willison H, Van den Bergh P, Comi G, Illa I, Nobile-Orazio E, van Doorn P, Dalakas M, Bojar M, Swan A; Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) Group. Randomized controlled trial of intravenous immunoglobulin versus oral prednisolone in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Ann Neurol. 2001 Aug;50(2):195-201.
  42. Zinman L, Ng E, Bril V. IV immunoglobulin in patients with myasthenia gravis: a randomized controlled trial. Neurology. 2007 Mar 13;68(11):837-41.
  43. Koski CL, Baumgarten M, Magder LS, et al. Derivation and validation of diagnostic criteria for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Journal of the Neurological Sciences 2009; 277:1-8.
  44. Sullivan KM, Storek J, Kopecky KJ, et al. A controlled trial of long-term administration of intravenous immunoglobulin to prevent late infection and chronic graft-vs.-host disease after marrow transplantation: clinical outcome and effect on subsequent immune recovery. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 1996;2:44-53.
  45. Alejandria MM, Lansang MA, Dans LF, Mantaring JB. Intravenous immunoglobulin for treating sepsis and septic shock. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2002;CD001090.
  46. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Committee on Practice Bulletins -- Obstetrics. Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy. ACOG Practice Pattern No. 6. Washington, DC: ACOG; September 1999.
  47. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: recommendations of CDC, the Infectious Disease Society of America, and the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. MMWR 2000;49(No. RR-10):1-128.
  48. Emerson GG, Herndon CN, Sreih AG. Thrombotic complications after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in two patients. Pharmacotherapy. 2002;22:1638-1641.
  49. Department of Health (London). Clinical Guidelines for Immunoglobulin Use: Update to Second Edition. August, 2011.
  50. Provan, Drew, et al. "Clinical guidelines for immunoglobulin use." Department of Health Publication, London (2008).
  51. Sussman J, Farrugia ME, Maddison P, et al. Myasthenia gravis: Association of British Neurologists’ management guidelines. Pract Neurol 2015; 15: 199-206.
  52. Sanders DB, Wolfe GI, Benatar M, et al. International consensus guidance for management of myasthenia gravis-Executive Summary. Neurology. 2016 Jul 26; 87(4): 419-25.
  53. Orange JS, Ballow M, Stiehm, et al. Use and interpretation of diagnostic vaccination in primary immunodeficiency: A working group report of the Basic and Clinical Immunology Interest Section of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol Vol 130 (3).
  54. Neunert C, Lim W, Crowther M, et al.  The American Society of Hematology 2011 Evidence-based practice guidelines for immune thrombocytopenia. Blood April 2011; Vol 117 (16).
  55. Jeffrey Modell Foundation Medical Advisory Board, 2013. 10 Warning Signs of Primary Immunodeficiency.  Jeffrey Modell Foundation, New York, NY.
  56. Bonilla FA, Khan DA, Ballas ZK, et al. Practice Parameter for the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2015 Nov;136(5):1186-205.e1-78.
  57. Kuitwaard K, de Gelder J, Tio-Gillen AP, et al. Pharmacokinetics of intravenous immunoglobulin and outcome in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Ann Neurol. 2009;66(5):597.
  58. Shehata N, Palda VA, Meyer RM, et al: The use of immunoglobulin therapy for patients undergoing solid organ transplantation: an evidence-based practice guideline. Transfus Med Rev 2010; 24 Suppl 1:S7-S27.
  59. Jordan SC, Tyan D, Stablein D, et al: Evaluation of intravenous immunoglobulin as an agent to lower allosensitization and improve transplantation in highly sensitized adult patients with end-stage renal disease: report of the NIH IG02 trial. J Am Soc Nephrol 2004; 15(12):3256-3262.
  60. Yuan XP, Wang CX, Gao W, et al: Kidney transplant in highly sensitized patients after desensitization with plasmapheresis and low-dose intravenous immunoglobulin. Exp Clin Transplant 2010; 8(2):130-135.
  61. Jordan SC, Quartel AW, Czer LSC, et al: Posttransplant therapy using high-dose human immunoglobulin (intravenous gamma globulin) to control acute humoral rejection in renal and cardiac allograft recipients and potential mechanism of action. Transplantation 1998; 66(6):800-805.
  62. Sullivan KM, Kopecky KJ, Jocom J, et al: Immunomodulatory and antimicrobial efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin in bone marrow transplantation. N Engl J Med 1990; 323:705-712.
  63. Bhatti AB, Gazali ZA. Recent Advances and Review on Treatment of Stiff Person Syndrome in Adults and Pediatric Patients. Cureus. 2015 Dec 22;7(12):e427
  64. Tanimoto K, Nakano K, Kano S, et al. Classification criteria for polymyositis and dermatomyositis. J Rheumatol. 1995 Apr;22(4):668-74.
  65. Kyriakides T, Angelini C, Schaefer J, et al. EFNS guidelines on the diagnostic approach to pauci- or asymptomatic hyperCKemia. Eur J Neurol. 2010 Jun 1;17(6):767-73.
  66. Feliciani C, Joly P, Jonkman MF, et al. Management of bullous pemphigoid: the European Dermatology Forum consensus in collaboration with the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology. Br J Dermatol. 2015 Apr;172(4):867-77.
  67. Hertl M, Jedlickova H, Karpati S, et al. Pemphigus. S2 Guideline for diagnosis and treatment--guided by the European Dermatology Forum (EDF) in cooperation with the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV). J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2015 Mar;29(3):405-14.
  68. Harman KE, Albert S, Black MM; British Association of Dermatologists. Guidelines for the management of pemphigus vulgaris. Br J Dermatol. 2003 Nov;149(5):926-37.
  69. Perez EE, Orange JS, Bonilla F, et al. Update on the use of immunoglobulin in human disease: A review of evidence. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2017 Mar;139(3S):S1-S46.
  70. Dantal J. Intravenous Immunoglobulins: In-Depth Review of Excipients and Acute Kidney Injury Risk. Am J Nephrol 2013;38:275-284.
  71. Rajabally YA et al. Validity of diagnostic criteria for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: A multicentre European study. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2009 Dec; 80:1364.
  72. Referenced with permission from the NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium®) Management of Immunotherapy-Related Toxicities, Version 1.2018. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 2018. The NCCN Compendium® is a derivative work of the NCCN Guidelines®. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, and NCCN GUIDELINES® are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.” To view the most recent and complete version of the Compendium, go online to NCCN.org. Accessed August 2018.
  73. Postow, MA. Managing Immune Checkpoint-Blocking Antibody Side Effects. American Society of Clinical Oncology Education Book. 2015; 76-83.
  74. Williams TJ, Benavides DR, Patrice KA. Association of Autoimmune Encephalitis with combined immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment for metastatic cancer. JAMA Neurol2016;73(8):928-933. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.1399
  75. Tomblyn M, Chiller T, Einsele H, et al. Guidelines for preventing infectious complications among hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients: a global perspective. Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2009;15(10):1143-1238. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2009.06.019. [PubMed 19747629]
  76. Willison HJ, Jacobs BS, van Doom PA. Guillain-Barré Syndrome. Lancet. 2016 Aug;388(10045):717-27. Epub 2016 Mar 2
  77. Sanders DB, Wolfe GI, Benetar M, et al. International consensus guidance for management of myasthenia gravis. Neurology 2016;87:1–7
  78. Van Winkle P, Burchette R, Kim R, et al. Prevalence and Safety of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Administration During Maintenance Chemotherapy in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Complete Remission: A Health Maintenance Organization Perspective. Perm J. 2018; 22: 17-141.
  79. First Coast Service Options, Inc. Local Coverage Determination (LCD): Intravenous Immune Globulin (L34007). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 4/13/2018 with effective date 4/12/2018. Accessed August 2018.
  80. Noridian Administrative Services, LLC. Local Coverage Determination (LCD): Immune Globulin Intravenous (IVIg) (L34074; L34314). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 5/25/2018 with effective date 07/1/2018. Accessed August 2018.
  81. Novitas Solutions, Inc. Local Coverage Determination (LCD): Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG) (L35093). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 7/20/2018 with effective date 4/13/2018. Accessed August 2018.
  82. Wisconsin Physicians Service Insurance Corporation. Local Coverage Determination (LCD): Immune Globulins (L34771). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 12/19/2017 with effective date 1/1/2018. Accessed August 2018.
  83. CGS, Administrators, LLC. Local Coverage Determination (LCD): Intravenous Immune Globulin (L35891). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 3/28/2018 with effective date 3/1/2018. Accessed August 2018.
  84. Palmetto GBA. Local Coverage Determination (LCD): Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) (L34580). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 7/20/2018 with effective date 7/26/2018. Accessed August 2018.
  85. National Coverage Determination (NCD) for Intravenous Immune Globulin for the Treatment of Autoimmune Mucocutaneous Blistering Diseases (250.3). Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 12/01/2015 with effective date 10/1/2015. Accessed August 2018.
  86. National Government Services, Inc. Local Coverage Article for Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG) - Related to LCD L33394 (A52446). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 9/22/2017 with effective date 10/7/2017. Accessed August 2018.
  87. Noridian Healthcare Solutions, LLC. Local Coverage Article for Intravenous Immune Globulin (IVIG)-NCD 250.3 – Related to LCD L34314, L34074 (A54641, A54643). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated on 1/18/2017 with effective date 11/7/2015. Accessed August 2018.
  88. Noridian Healthcare Solutions, LLC. Local Coverage Article: Coverage of Intravenous Immune Globulin for Treatment of Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases in the Home – Medicare Benefit Policy Manual, Chapter 15, (A54660, A54662). Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Inc. Updated 4/2/2018 with effective date 4/12/2018. Accessed August 2018.

Appendix 1 – Covered Diagnosis Codes

ICD-10

ICD-10 Description

A48.3

Toxic shock syndrome

B20

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease

B25.0

Cytomegaloviral pneumonitis

B25.1

Cytomegaloviral hepatitis

B25.2

Cytomegaloviral pancreatitis

B25.8

Other cytomegaloviral diseases

B25.9

Cytomegaloviral disease, unspecified

C91.10

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia of B-cell type not having achieved remission

C91.11

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia of B-cell type in remission

C91.12

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia of B-cell type in relapse

C90.00

Multiple Myeloma not having achieved remission

C90.01

Multiple Myeloma in remission

C90.02

Multiple Myeloma in relapse

C90.10

Plasma cell leukemia not having achieved remission

C90.11

Plasma cell leukemia in remission

C90.12

Plasma cell leukemia in relapse

C90.00

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia not having achieved remission

C90.01

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in remission

C90.02

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse

D69.3

Immune thrombocytopenic purpura

D69.41

Evans syndrome

D69.42

Congenital and hereditary thrombocytopenic purpura

D69.49

Other primary thrombocytopenia

D69.59

Other secondary thrombocytopenia

D80.0

Hereditary hypogammaglobulinemia

D80.1

Nonfamilial hypogammaglobulinemia

D80.3

Selective deficiency of immunoglobulin G [IgG] subclasses

D80.5

Immunodeficiency with increased immunoglobulin M [IgM]

D80.7

Transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy

D81.0

Severe combined immunodeficiency [SCID] with reticular dysgenesis

D81.1

Severe combined immunodeficiency [SCID] with low T- and B-cell numbers

D81.2

Severe combined immunodeficiency [SCID] with low or normal B-cell numbers

D81.6

Major histocompatibility complex class I deficiency

D81.7

Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency

D81.89

Other combined immunodeficiencies

D81.9

Combined immunodeficiency, unspecified

D82.0

Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

D82.1

DiGeorge's syndrome

D83.0

Common variable immunodeficiency with predominant abnormalities of B-cell numbers and function

D83.2

Common variable immunodeficiency with autoantibodies to B- or T-cells

D83.8

Other common variable immunodeficiencies

D83.9

Common variable immunodeficiency, unspecified

D89.810

Acute graft-versus-host disease

D89.812

Acute on chronic graft-versus-host disease

G03.8

Meningitis due to other specified causes

G03.9

Meningitis, unspecified

G04.81

Other encephalitis and encephalomyelitis

G04.89

Other myelitis

G04.90

Encephalitis and encephalomyelitis, unspecified

G04.91

Myelitis, unspecified

G25.82

Stiff-man syndrome

G56.80

Other specified mononeuropathies of unspecified upper limb

G56.81

Other specified mononeuropathies of right upper limb

G56.82

Other specified mononeuropathies of left upper limb

G56.83

Other specified mononeuropathies of bilateral upper limbs

G56.90

Unspecified mononeuropathy of unspecified upper limb

G56.91

Unspecified mononeuropathy of right upper limb

G56.92

Unspecified mononeuropathy of left upper limb

G56.93

Unspecified mononeuropathy of bilateral upper limbs

G57.80

Other specified mononeuropathies of unspecified lower limb

G57.81

Other specified mononeuropathies of right lower limb

G57.82

Other specified mononeuropathies of left lower limb

G57.83

Other specified mononeuropathies of bilateral lower limbs

G57.90

Unspecified mononeuropathy of unspecified lower limb

G57.91

Unspecified mononeuropathy of right lower limb

G57.92

Unspecified mononeuropathy of left lower limb

G57.93

Unspecified mononeuropathy of bilateral lower limbs

G61.0

Guillain-Barre syndrome

G61.1

Serum neuropathy

G61.81*

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuritis

G61.82

Multifocal motor neuropathy

G61.89

Other inflammatory polyneuropathies

G61.9

Inflammatory polyneuropathy, unspecified

G62.89

Other specified polyneuropathies

G70.00

Myasthenia gravis without (acute) exacerbation

G70.01

Myasthenia gravis with (acute) exacerbation

G90.09

Other idiopathic peripheral autonomic neuropathy

J70.2

Acute drug-induced interstitial lung disorders

J70.4

Drug-induced interstitial lung disorders, unspecified

L10.0

Pemphigus vulgaris

L10.2

Pemphigus foliaceous

L12.0

Bullous pemphigoid

L12.1

Cicatricial pemphigoid

L12.30

Acquired epidermolysis bullosa, unspecified

L12.31

Epidermolysis bullosa due to drug

L12.35

Other acquired epidermolysis bullosa

L12.5

Other acquired epidermolysis bullosa

L13.8

Other specified bullous disorders

M06.4

Inflammatory polyarthropathy

M30.3

Mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome [Kawasaki]

M33.00

Juvenile dermatomyositis, organ involvement unspecified

M33.01

Juvenile dermatomyositis with respiratory involvement

M33.02

Juvenile dermatomyositis with myopathy

M33.03

Juvenile dermatomyositis without myopathy

M33.09

Juvenile dermatomyositis with other organ involvement

M33.10

Other dermatomyositis, organ involvement unspecified

M33.11

Other dermatomyositis with respiratory involvement

M33.12

Other dermatomyositis with myopathy

M33.13

Other dermatomyositis without myopathy

M33.19

Other dermatomyositis with other organ involvement

M33.20

Polymyositis, organ involvement unspecified

M33.21

Polymyositis with respiratory involvement

M33.22

Polymyositis with myopathy

M33.29

Polymyositis with other organ involvement

M33.90

Dermatopolymyositis, unspecified, organ involvement unspecified

M33.91

Dermatopolymyositis, unspecified with respiratory involvement

M33.92

Dermatopolymyositis, unspecified with myopathy

M33.93

Dermatopolymyositis, unspecified without myopathy

M33.99

Dermatopolymyositis, unspecified with other organ involvement

M36.0

Dermato(poly)myositis in neoplastic disease

O26.40

Herpes gestationis, unspecified trimester

O26.41

Herpes gestationis, first trimester

O26.42

Herpes gestationis, second trimester

O26.43

Herpes gestationis, third trimester

P61.0

Transient neonatal thrombocytopenia

T86.00

Unspecified complication of bone marrow transplant

T86.01

Bone marrow transplant rejection

T86.02

Bone marrow transplant failure

T86.03

Bone marrow transplant infection

T86.09

Other complications of bone marrow transplant

T86.10

Unspecified complication of kidney transplant

T86.11

Kidney transplant rejection

T86.12

Kidney transplant failure

T86.13

Kidney transplant infection

T86.19

Other complication of kidney transplant

T86.20

Unspecified complication of heart transplant

T86.21

Heart transplant rejection

T86.22

Heart transplant failure

T86.23

Heart transplant infection

T86.290

Cardiac allograft vasculopathy

T86.298

Other complications of heart transplant

T86.30

Unspecified complication of heart-lung transplant

T86.31

Heart-lung transplant rejection

T86.32

Heart-lung transplant failure

T86.33

Heart-lung transplant infection

T86.39

Other complications of heart-lung transplant

T86.40

Unspecified complication of liver transplant

T86.41

Liver transplant rejection

T86.42

Liver transplant failure

T86.43

Liver transplant infection

T86.49

Other complications of liver transplant

T86.810

Lung transplant rejection

T86.811

Lung transplant failure

T86.812

Lung transplant infection

T86.818

Other complications of lung transplant

T86.819

Unspecified complication of lung transplant

T86.890

Other transplanted tissue rejection

T86.891

Other transplanted tissue failure

T86.892

Other transplanted tissue infection

T86.898

Other complications of other transplanted tissue

T86.899

Unspecified complication of other transplanted tissue

Z48.21

Encounter for aftercare following heart transplant

Z48.22

Encounter for aftercare following kidney transplant

Z48.23

Encounter for aftercare following liver transplant

Z48.24

Encounter for aftercare following lung transplant

Z48.280

Encounter for aftercare following heart-lung transplant

Z48.290

Encounter for aftercare following bone marrow transplant

Z94.0

Kidney transplant status

Z94.1

Heart transplant status

Z94.2

Lung transplant status

Z94.3

Heart and lungs transplant status

Z94.4

Liver transplant status

Z94.81

Bone marrow transplant status

Z94.83

Pancreas transplant status

Z94.84

Stem cells transplant status

*G61.81 is not payable when associated with diabetes mellitus, dysproteinemias, renal failure, or malnutrition

Appendix 2 – Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

Medicare coverage for outpatient (Part B) drugs is outlined in the Medicare Benefit Policy Manual (Pub. 100-2), Chapter 15, §50 Drugs and Biologicals. In addition, National Coverage Determination (NCD) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs) may exist and compliance with these policies is required where applicable. They can be found at: http://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/advanced-search.aspx. Additional indications may be covered at the discretion of the health plan.

Medicare Part B Covered Diagnosis Codes (applicable to existing NCD/LCD):

Jurisdiction(s): N

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): L34007

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/lcd-date-search.aspx?DocID=L34007&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==  

Jurisdiction(s): F

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): L34074

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/lcd-date-search.aspx?DocID=L34074&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==  

Jurisdiction(s): L; H

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): L35093

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/lcd-date-search.aspx?DocID=L35093&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==  

Jurisdiction(s): E

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): L34314

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/lcd-date-search.aspx?DocID=L34314&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==  

Jurisdiction(s): 5, 8

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): L34771

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/lcd-date-search.aspx?DocID=L34771&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==  

Jurisdiction(s): J, M

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): L34580

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/lcd-date-search.aspx?DocID=L34580&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA== 

Jurisdiction(s): ALL

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): 250.3

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/details/ncd-details.aspx?NCDId=158&ncdver=1&DocID=250.3&bc=gAAAABAAAAAAAA%3d%3d&  

Jurisdiction(s): 15

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): L35891

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/lcd-date-search.aspx?DocID=L35891&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==

Jurisdiction(s): E

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): A54641, A54643

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/article-date-search.aspx?DocID=A54641&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==    

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/article-date-search.aspx?DocID=A54643&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==   

Jurisdiction(s): E

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): A54660, A54662

 https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/document-id-search-results.aspx?DocID=A54660&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA%3d%3d&

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/document-id-search-results.aspx?DocID=A54662&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA%3d%3d&

Jurisdiction(s): 6, K

NCD/LCD/Article Document (s): A52446

https://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/search/article-date-search.aspx?DocID=A52446&bc=gAAAAAAAAAAAAA==

Medicare Part B Administrative Contractor (MAC) Jurisdictions

Jurisdiction

Applicable State/US Territory

Contractor

E (1)

CA, HI, NV, AS, GU, CNMI

Noridian Healthcare Solutions, LLC

F (2 & 3)

AK, WA, OR, ID, ND, SD, MT, WY, UT, AZ

Noridian Healthcare Solutions, LLC

5

KS, NE, IA, MO

Wisconsin Physicians Service Insurance Corporation (WPS)

6

MN, WI, IL

National Government Services, Inc. (NGS)

H (4 & 7)

LA, AR, MS, TX, OK, CO, NM

Novitas Solutions, Inc.

8

MI, IN

Wisconsin Physicians Service Insurance Corporation (WPS)

N (9)

FL, PR, VI

First Coast Service Options, Inc.

J (10)

TN, GA, AL

Palmetto GBA, LLC

M (11)

NC, SC, WV, VA (excluding below)

Palmetto GBA, LLC

L (12)

DE, MD, PA, NJ, DC (includes Arlington & Fairfax counties and the city of Alexandria in VA)

Novitas Solutions, Inc.

K (13 & 14)

NY, CT, MA, RI, VT, ME, NH

National Government Services, Inc. (NGS)

15

KY, OH

CGS Administrators, LLC

 

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